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How to cook steak for a special treat

When I go out to eat, if I’m feeling dog-tired, I might order steak – I find it really perks me up on a my-kids-have-been-too-noisy-I-can’t-cope kind of day. The immediacy of the effect is probably more psychological than anything to do with the high iron levels in red meat. (Sadly, the mineral just doesn’t affect energy levels that fast.) But still, who cares if the dish makes you feel better?

And yet I’ve never cooked steak at home. I’m just too worried about screwing up something that’s such a luxury.

But I would love to be able to say, ‘I can cook a mean steak’, and to have it as a standby birthday meal if we can’t make it out for dinner. After all, it’s cooked fast – which means I can includHealthier Mummy food challengee it as a 30-minute Healthier Mummy challenge dish – and it’s a great source of protein, zinc and B-vitamins as well as iron so is nutritious too. You just have to watch out for the sauces you serve it up with, how much fat it’s cooked with, and of course that you don’t gorge on red meat too often.

With all this in mind, I was really pleased when we tackled steak during my Cooking with Confidence course at Leiths School of Food and Wine in west London, an evening class course tackling a variety of cooking over six weeks, including choux pastry and pasta-making.

Of course, now that I’ve cooked steak once, I can tell you that it’s really not all that hard. It’s all in the timing and the oven temperature, and of course your confidence with a great hunk of (expensive) meat. I’m sure I could have managed it solo. But I’m still pleased that my steak initiation was under a chef’s watchful eye.

This particular steak was a rib eye – so yep, probably the fattiest, and there are leaner cuts that you might prefer, like sirloin. But my chef tutors said this is their preferred cut because it has the most flavour.

Ahem, the recipe below called for rather a lot of fat and oil, as you can see in this picture below.

searing rib-eye steak

But my goodness, it was fab. I would definitely stick to it as a very occasional treat though.

Also bear in mind that this recipe is for a really large cut for two to three people that you slice to serve.

 

Seared rib eye steak recipe

seared rib-eye steak with roast potatoes

Recipe courtesy of Leiths School of Food and Wine

Serves 2/3

1 bone rib eye steak (about 600g)
2 tablespoons oil
30g unsalted butter
1 clove garlic
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

Heat the oven to 200°C/ gas mark 6.

To prepare the steak, cut the garlic clove in half and rub over the surface of the steak. Brush with some oil and season with pepper. Leave to come up to room temperature.

Heat the remaining oil with the unsalted butter in an ovenproof frying pan with a heavy base, until it’s very hot. Season the steak with salt and sear for three mins on each side, basting with the oil and butter as it cooks.

Place the frying pan in the oven and cook the steak for five minutes, before turning it over and cooking for another five minutes. Baste again. This steak will end up cooked medium-rare as in the picture.

Allow the steak to rest in a warm place, uncovered, for 1o t0 20 minutes before carving.

Carve the meat into thickish slices across the grain of the meat, and serve with chimichurri sauce as in the photo, traditionally served with steaks in Argentina.

Disclosure: I was given a free Cooking with Confidence course at Leiths School of Food and Wine  for review purposes. For more information on their cooking courses, please click on the link. 

You may like to read:

A gluten-free cake for pudding 
Healthy lamb, quinoa and feta burgers 
How a cartouche can help you cook onions and stews 

 


Comments (22)

  • Avatar

    Bek

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    This looks great as a treat! We really enjoy eating steak in our house and this looks like something we could make at home. Thanks for sharing :-)

  • Avatar

    Em @ snowingindoors

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    I’m always too nervous to cook steak for my husband, I don’t eat it and would hate to ruin it, but this looks easy to follow, might have to try this, thanks.

    • Avatar

      healthiermummy

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      Best of luck! If you’re not eating it, best to serve this one when you have a friend over to help out your husband as it’s a big bit of meat.

  • Avatar

    Hannah Staveley

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    Not for me been a veggie but my hubby would love this .x

  • Avatar

    Jen aka Muminthemadhouse

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    We have a Tefal Optigril and it takes all the guesswork out of cooking steak. It is amazing

    • Avatar

      healthiermummy

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      Sounds interesting, never heard of one of those!

  • Avatar

    Polly

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    I’m not a meat eater, but I love cooking a special meal at home

  • Avatar

    You Baby Me Mummy

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    That looks yummy! We can never cook steak well at home x

  • Avatar

    Amy Squires

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    Steak is my favorite and I always order it when we are out. However I wouldn’t say I was the best cook but I’d love to try this at home!

  • Avatar

    Joanna Sormunen

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    I have never tried to cook a steak. Thank you, this really came in handy for me. And it sounds so delicious!

  • Avatar

    Model Mummy

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    What a fab day out that must have been.
    I do like a good steak myself and i find it difficult to get right.

    Lovely recipe – thanks for sharing!

  • Avatar

    Actually Mummy...

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    I’ve never heard of part cooking in the oven – I’m not to bad a griddling steak, but I never get it absolutely perfect. Maybe this is the trick I was missing!

  • Avatar

    Sarah Bailey

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    Ohh my other half is such a huge steak fan – I wouldn’t have had an idea how to cook it with confidence perhaps I should give it a try now though. x

  • Avatar

    Zena's Suitcase

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    OMG that looks amazing, not sure I could do it as well as you though :(

  • Avatar

    Aisha from expatlog

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    Every man and his dog cooks steak here in Canada. Aside from burgers and wings it’s staple fare, and perfect for the bbq that everyone has out back 😉
    There are all kinds of rubs available for steak too, the most popular one seems to be Montreal Steak Seasoning.
    Like you I was wary of ruining it the first time I cooked it but now I can do it with my eyes closed. It HAS to be consumed with a good bottle of red though…

  • Avatar

    Adele @ Circus Queen

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    Steak! I love it so much but am so bad at cooking it! But I’ve never thought to actually look for instructions.

  • Avatar

    Shell Louise

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    Looks gorgeous and I know the hubby would love it, probably more than me!

  • Avatar

    Liska @NewMumOnline

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    Oh I do love me some steak and your photography is superb. This post will be so helpful to so many steak lovers out there x

  • Avatar

    Globalmouse

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    I love preparing a special meal at home…it’s lovely to make something you know you’ll all really enjoy!

  • Avatar

    Jenny

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    We love cooking steak, it has to be cooked really well though. Unlike my husband who eats his pink!

  • Avatar

    ninja cat

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    Steak well done for me please

  • Avatar

    Laura

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    That steak looks lovely. I always grill mine to eliminate any excess grease. The one tip that my mum told me was to flash-fry (or flash-grill in my case) your steak to seal in the flavour and then turn the heat down and allow it to cook slowly.

Comments are closed